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From Where i start Programming in Linux??

Help to a newbie

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  • AmmielLoDebarAmmielLoDebar Member Posts: 16
    [b][red]This message was edited by DragonSlayah at 2003-2-25 11:25:44[/red][/b][hr]
    : Help to a newbie
    :

    It all depends on if you mean web developing on linux or app dev. Personally, I'd start with checking if you have gcc (at the shell, type gcc) if it says invalid blah-blah, find and download gcc (search for gcc at http://www.rpmfind.com) and I'm thinking you are using a graphical linux/xwindows environment? If you do have gcc, then learn C or C++, Java, Perl, or any other mainly used language in linux. When compiling the syntax (for C/C++ anyways) is gcc source.c(or cpp...) -o *exenamehere*

    At least that command to gcc will do you for a few months, but then you will have seperate files of code etc...but you can ask when you get there...or find a doc.
  • fnoyanfnoyan Member Posts: 103
    : Help to a newbie
    :

    Hi

    "Help to a newbie"...extremly general but according to me start from learning C then C++ and Java comes after. C is the basic, so, if you learn it, it won't be problem for you to learn C++,Java,PHP,Perl,GTK or any other C like languages. And, you can also download the sources of linux programs from internet(most of them are written with C or C++), but it is necessary to learn C++ after C I think because most libraries are now written for C++ and it is easier than C.

  • abcabc Member Posts: 443
    : Hi
    :
    : "Help to a newbie"...extremly general but according to me start from learning C then C++ and Java comes after. C is the basic, so, if you learn it, it won't be problem for you to learn C++,Java,PHP,Perl,GTK or any other C like languages. And, you can also download the sources of linux programs from internet(most of them are written with C or C++), but it is necessary to learn C++ after C I think because most libraries are now written for C++ and it is easier than C.
    :

    actually most libraries are writen for C - you can recognize the (few) ones written for C++ by the fact that you need to use a compatible compiler version to link against them (name mangling and such). the typical examples are qt & kde, gtkmm and associates, etc.

    C++ is NOT ALWAYS easier than C - true, you have some standard libraries that make life easier, but OO programming design can be more complex than the procedural one, especially for larger projects. also, with more power (oo) come more chances of messing things up, so as usual things sort of balance out.

    on a different note, if you want to do C++ programming some would argue that learning C first puts you on the wrong way of thinking (the argument being 'try java first'). personally I saw (smart) people having more trouble with efficient use of C++ coming from java than from C. go whichever way you like, but in terms of efficiency probably C->C++ is better. besides, as I was saying, one uses a lot of C libs in linux (the basics indeed) ... so it comes in really handy.
  • korkor Member Posts: 198
    : : Hi
    : :
    : : "Help to a newbie"...extremly general but according to me start from learning C then C++ and Java comes after. C is the basic, so, if you learn it, it won't be problem for you to learn C++,Java,PHP,Perl,GTK or any other C like languages. And, you can also download the sources of linux programs from internet(most of them are written with C or C++), but it is necessary to learn C++ after C I think because most libraries are now written for C++ and it is easier than C.
    : :
    :
    : actually most libraries are writen for C - you can recognize the (few) ones written for C++ by the fact that you need to use a compatible compiler version to link against them (name mangling and such). the typical examples are qt & kde, gtkmm and associates, etc.
    :
    : C++ is NOT ALWAYS easier than C - true, you have some standard libraries that make life easier, but OO programming design can be more complex than the procedural one, especially for larger projects. also, with more power (oo) come more chances of messing things up, so as usual things sort of balance out.
    :
    : on a different note, if you want to do C++ programming some would argue that learning C first puts you on the wrong way of thinking (the argument being 'try java first'). personally I saw (smart) people having more trouble with efficient use of C++ coming from java than from C. go whichever way you like, but in terms of efficiency probably C->C++ is better. besides, as I was saying, one uses a lot of C libs in linux (the basics indeed) ... so it comes in really handy.
    :
    It would seem that I'm the odd one, but I like assembler, even in unix/linux. It's fairly easy to call c/c++ library functions, the nasm docs say how. All the syscalls are listed (at least in freebsd) in /usr/src/sys/sys/(something or other else goes here, I forget, being in windows at the moment), I think. Nasm is a compiler, check the x86 area's compilers for it.
  • fnoyanfnoyan Member Posts: 103

    : It would seem that I'm the odd one, but I like assembler, even in unix/linux. It's fairly easy to call c/c++ library functions, the nasm docs say how. All the syscalls are listed (at least in freebsd) in /usr/src/sys/sys/(something or other else goes here, I forget, being in windows at the moment), I think. Nasm is a compiler, check the x86 area's compilers for it.

    Hi
    Once, I tried to use asm under Linux but it is not useful I think!It is difficult to write the codes, and it takes much more time to write simple routines than C. Also the size of executibles are not much more smaller than any other executibles written with C or any other language! It is different under DOS. Under DOS, an asm executible can be 1000 times smaller than any C executible in size!
    The list of syscalls can be found in the /usr/include/asm/unistd.h. But in the point of view of me using asm under UNIX based systems is not useful if you don't have any other choice!
  • korkor Member Posts: 198
    :
    : : It would seem that I'm the odd one, but I like assembler, even in unix/linux. It's fairly easy to call c/c++ library functions, the nasm docs say how. All the syscalls are listed (at least in freebsd) in /usr/src/sys/sys/(something or other else goes here, I forget, being in windows at the moment), I think. Nasm is a compiler, check the x86 area's compilers for it.
    :
    : Hi
    : Once, I tried to use asm under Linux but it is not useful I think!It is difficult to write the codes, and it takes much more time to write simple routines than C. Also the size of executibles are not much more smaller than any other executibles written with C or any other language! It is different under DOS. Under DOS, an asm executible can be 1000 times smaller than any C executible in size!
    : The list of syscalls can be found in the /usr/include/asm/unistd.h. But in the point of view of me using asm under UNIX based systems is not useful if you don't have any other choice!
    :
    I'm betting you used libraries for your syscalls, not actual syscalls. Those wrappers, plus it including excess stuff, can make those executables bigger.
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