Books on UNIX

Group

I'm looking to buy a few books to help me learn and become a better programmer and knowledgable. If any one can sugguest a good book to learn from, either title or author, I will greatly appreciate it. This message board said UNIX and LINUX, but I was looking for UNIX. If LINUX is the same or next better thing, then suggest a book on LINUX.

The topics I'm looking for are:
*System Administration/Network Administration
(*a general programming book -C, C++, UNIX)

I am search for good books that when I read them, it won't be too diffcult to learn from. There are tons of books out there, but I would just like opinions and suggestions. If you have a favorite, please, let me know.

Thanks for your time.

-=The Best Has Yet To Come=-

Comments

  • [b][red]This message was edited by Moderator at 2005-9-5 1:36:4[/red][/b][hr]
    : but I was looking for UNIX. If LINUX is the same or next better thing,
    :then suggest a book on LINUX.

    Linux is a free UNIX clone which means basically that virtually all the commands are the same (there are minor differences in a few - then again most of the major unices usually do have their own variations). Linux is probably better than UNIX for your requirements, because it is more modern and has some nice snazzy tools, which UNIX doesn't have (but probably could get, which some tweaking).

    For the book, I'd recommend Linux in a Nutshell.

    Although the book is not a 'teaching' book as such, it is an excellent command reference. I hardly ever use man pages, instead I simply turn to my copy of the book. It tells you all of the most commonly used options to the relevant commands, and has every linux command you will ever need (whether it be programming, sys admin, etc).

    They recommend buying Running Linux to go with it (which is a 'teaching' book. I've read this (got it out the library - couldn't afford it), and I think it is a very good introduction to linux, and explains a lot of the core concepts well, however, it does try to cover a lot of stuff, so some sections are a little shallow (these sections would require whole books on their own, eg the part on Tcl/Tk). I'd say, do what I did - get a copy out of the library first, before you buy it, to see if you really need it.


    'Classic shell scripting' [O'Reilly], is an excellent book, it covers all of the core details of shell scripting that you would need. I've heard (but haven't read) that UNIX power tools is another excellent book, but I can't recommend, because I haven't read it.

    I hope this helps,

    ITA
  • : [b][red]This message was edited by Moderator at 2005-9-5 1:36:4[/red][/b][hr]
    : : but I was looking for UNIX. If LINUX is the same or next better thing,
    : :then suggest a book on LINUX.
    :
    : Linux is a free UNIX clone which means basically that virtually all the commands are the same (there are minor differences in a few - then again most of the major unices usually do have their own variations). Linux is probably better than UNIX for your requirements, because it is more modern and has some nice snazzy tools, which UNIX doesn't have (but probably could get, which some tweaking).
    :
    : For the book, I'd recommend Linux in a Nutshell.
    :
    : Although the book is not a 'teaching' book as such, it is an excellent command reference. I hardly ever use man pages, instead I simply turn to my copy of the book. It tells you all of the most commonly used options to the relevant commands, and has every linux command you will ever need (whether it be programming, sys admin, etc).
    :
    : They recommend buying Running Linux to go with it (which is a 'teaching' book. I've read this (got it out the library - couldn't afford it), and I think it is a very good introduction to linux, and explains a lot of the core concepts well, however, it does try to cover a lot of stuff, so some sections are a little shallow (these sections would require whole books on their own, eg the part on Tcl/Tk). I'd say, do what I did - get a copy out of the library first, before you buy it, to see if you really need it.
    :
    :
    : 'Classic shell scripting' [O'Reilly], is an excellent book, it covers all of the core details of shell scripting that you would need. I've heard (but haven't read) that UNIX power tools is another excellent book, but I can't recommend, because I haven't read it.
    :
    : I hope this helps,
    :
    : ITA
    :
    I think, Linux will also be the best choice. In most distribution there is also a linux users guide and a linux administrators guide included, you can also download these from the linux documentation project (ldp).
    They are not the newest, but free and they will give you a basic understanding of commands, shells and the unix enviroment.
    Another way is to search and take a look at the many many resources in the internet. I think you will find a lot of helpful pages, once you got some basic ideas.
    [black]SaThaRiel[/black]

    [size=1][blue]Any time things appear to be going better, you have overlooked something.[/blue][/size]

  • : Group
    :
    : I'm looking to buy a few books to help me learn and become a better programmer and knowledgable. If any one can sugguest a good book to learn from, either title or author, I will greatly appreciate it. This message board said UNIX and LINUX, but I was looking for UNIX. If LINUX is the same or next better thing, then suggest a book on LINUX.
    :
    : The topics I'm looking for are:
    : *System Administration/Network Administration
    : (*a general programming book -C, C++, UNIX)
    :
    : I am search for good books that when I read them, it won't be too diffcult to learn from. There are tons of books out there, but I would just like opinions and suggestions. If you have a favorite, please, let me know.
    :
    : Thanks for your time.
    :
    : -=The Best Has Yet To Come=-
    :






    I think you should search for C++ books from "FAQ" option given on Programmersheaven.com.last question is given for C++ books.

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