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So I want to learn C++, should I?

xeneppxenepp Member Posts: 1
I know, it's been asked a thousand times, but I do have specific needs.. sorta.

I want to program games for the PC with particle effects, maybe some 3D at some point but mainly rich 2D to begin with.

I also have no programming experience and.. I'm 24. Bit too long in the tooth?

I did touch on C++ years ago but it confused the crap outta me. I think I may have more patience for it these days and having used computers since I had my Atari ST, I know a thing or two about how they work.

So essentially, is C++ for me? Where should I go to get started?

Thanks in advance and sorry for the dumb-ass newbie question!

Joel

Comments

  • FazFaz Member Posts: 75
    I've wanted to be a games programmer for years now, (pretty much when I first touched a computer!) I've been recommended .NET and C#, I'm starting a course in two months, go for that!
  • tsagldtsagld Member Posts: 621
    : I've wanted to be a games programmer for years now, (pretty much when I first touched a computer!) I've been recommended .NET and C#, I'm starting a course in two months, go for that!
    :

    If you want to create fancy action games, then performance will be a major issue.
    In that case, .NET (and therefore C#) is definitely NOT the way to go! .NET is a great environment for programmers, but not if speed becomes important.
    C or C++ with some assembler is by far the better choice here.


    Greets,
    Eric Goldstein
    http://www.gvh-maatwerk.nl


  • bilderbikkelbilderbikkel Member Posts: 754
    I totally agree with tsaql. C and C++ are the fastest languages around with many libraries as well. E.g. Doom and Quake are programmed using the free OpenGL library. Personally I am a big fan of C++ Builder (www.codepedia.com/1/CppBuilder), though it is not for free, as it is a handy IDE with the VCL (and CLX) libraries being type-safe(r) wrappers around Win32 API functions. Said otherwise, you can do any high-speed low-level graphics lightning fast (using bitblitting and scanLine access). For 3D stuff I'd recommend OpenGL.

    Learning C++ is also easier in C++ Builder (or another graphical IDE), as you can easily visualize whatever you want. And learning by programming games is a great way to learn to program!

    See ya,
    bilderbikkel

  • bluj91bluj91 Member Posts: 133
    : I know, it's been asked a thousand times, but I do have specific needs.. sorta.
    :
    : I want to program games for the PC with particle effects, maybe some 3D at some point but mainly rich 2D to begin with.
    :
    : I also have no programming experience and.. I'm 24. Bit too long in the tooth?
    :
    : I did touch on C++ years ago but it confused the crap outta me. I think I may have more patience for it these days and having used computers since I had my Atari ST, I know a thing or two about how they work.
    :
    : So essentially, is C++ for me? Where should I go to get started?
    :
    : Thanks in advance and sorry for the dumb-ass newbie question!
    :
    : Joel
    :

    Me thinks that if you've never programmed before than you'll have to be patient when learning C/C++. Your first programs will all be commandline things and it'll probably take months before you can program graphics efficently.

    Also there are lots of issues with compatibility when writing games. Make sure when you learn to use a graphics library you use a good one, like openGL, not one that has or will be axed.

    I'ld also recommend something like BASIC or Macromedia Flash if you want to produce games efficently and quickly withput memorising a hundred different commands.

    Basically it depends on want you want to do if you want to get a job learn C/C++ and openGL if you want to do it for a pasttime use something BASIC or Macromedia Flash.

    note: some people using something called dark basic for 3D games, looks easy.
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