Poll: What's your age and how much experience do you have?

[b][red]This message was edited by Wannabean333 at 2004-1-27 16:9:48[/red][/b][hr]
I'm 15 and I've been programming on and off for 2 years now. I started with basic c++ (no pointers) and ive been doing pretty well. I don't know very much but I'm satisfied with my progress. I'm just wondering how much experience everyone that uses this site has and how old you all are. I also would like to know how people here got started programming. I'm just curious.

"It's only worth what someone will pay for it."
-Wannabean333 (*********)


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Comments

  • : I'm 15 and I've been programming on and off for 2 years now. I
    : started with basic c++ (no pointers) and ive been doing pretty
    : well. I don't know very much but I'm satisfied with my progress.
    : I'm just wondering how much experience everyone that uses this site
    : has and how old you all are. I also would like to know how people
    : here got started programming. I'm just curious.
    :
    I'm 19 (as of yesterday!) and got started when I was about 8. That was on a BBC Micro, using its BASIC interpreter. Over the years I played with QBasic and VB. Since getting access to the internet, I've learnt all sorts (if only I'd had access to it at a younger age!). I'm pretty good in Perl, OK in C (I started learning it in October last year so I could write an audio engine - it's doing well and I like the language), and I've played with C#.Net, amongst other things. I know stuff like HTML, CSS, SQL, etc. I'm currently at university doing a computer science degree. I guess I could say I have 10 years experience, though that doesn't mean I'm any good. :-)

    : "It's only worth what someone will pay for it."
    : -Wannabean333 (*********)
    No. The most worthwhile things are the things that people choose to use. And the tools I love to use most are generally free.

    Hope this satisfies your curiosity,

    Jonathan

    ###
    for(74,117,115,116){$::a.=chr};(($_.='qwertyui')&&
    (tr/yuiqwert/her anot/))for($::b);for($::c){$_.=$^X;
    /(p.{2}l)/;$_=$1}$::b=~/(..)$/;print("$::a$::b $::c hack$1.");

  • Well, let me put it this way -- I have grandchildren who are older than you are, and I started programming several years before you were born.

    At your age, if you like programming, try to expand your knowledge into other languages such as Java and HTML because they are very important in web development. It's really not that important at the present that you are not an expert in any of these languages, but it will make future studies easier if you are already familiar with them.
  • [blue]See my nick for the age, and, of course, remember, that with passage of time my nick will not change, but the age will...

    I began on IBM 360 (FORTRAN, ASM) in 1981.
    [/blue]
  • I'm 17 years old and a Senior in High School, I first started programming in the 9th grade. So just over 3 1/2 years experience here. I started out with writing C++, and I've tried to pick up on other languages such as Java and even a little bit of Assembly Language, but I have always found that C++ is my favorite.
  • I'm 20 and I started programming when I was about 16. I started off using Turing, then C++. I'm now working on my Computer Science degree and have done C, C++, Java, HTML, C scripting in UNIX, and now Assembly at University. I only wish I had started programming and seriously learning about the computer at a young age, as most of the stuff I am now learning about the low-level working of the actual computer amazes me.
  • : [b][red]This message was edited by Wannabean333 at 2004-1-27 16:9:48[/red][/b][hr]
    : I'm 15 and I've been programming on and off for 2 years now. I started with basic c++ (no pointers) and ive been doing pretty well. I don't know very much but I'm satisfied with my progress. I'm just wondering how much experience everyone that uses this site has and how old you all are. I also would like to know how people here got started programming. I'm just curious.
    :
    : "It's only worth what someone will pay for it."
    : -Wannabean333 (*********)
    :
    : I am 31 and have programmed on and off (mostly off) for a few years. I mostly work with assembler, but i am trying to catch up on C programming, and eventualy plan to study C++
    :

  • : [blue]See my nick for the age, and, of course, remember, that with passage of time my nick will not change, but the age will...
    :
    : I began on IBM 360 (FORTRAN, ASM) in 1981.
    : [/blue]
    :
    Wow! I wish i went that far back, the 'ol '360 (which i never even heard of - punch card??) must have been a joy. I am using a fairly modern computer (1.6GHz) to write this message, but i love to program assembler on my relativly ancient i486 SX 33Mhz running DOS6.2. I recently switched to the Pass32 assembler from a86, for it's many great features. What are you using to program now? Do you still tinker with Assembly?

  • I'm 16 and i had my first ever experience with "programming" on a Commodore 64 when i was about 6 or 7 writing BASIC programs that flashed the colours of the screen and border or scrolled text or did sums etc. I started programming on windows PCs about 3 years ago starting with Visual Basic and HTML which i played with for about a year before i decided to move onto learning C/C++ and toying with javascript here and there.

    I've read 2 (pretty old) C++ books, 1 game programming book, and i am currently reading another C++ book to learn about all this template stuff and the STL. I have wrote several small games throughout my 3 years of programming and i am soon to be starting college after which i'll be moving onto university to get a degree in computer science.
  • : : [blue]See my nick for the age, and, of course, remember, that with passage of time my nick will not change, but the age will...
    : :
    : : I began on IBM 360 (FORTRAN, ASM) in 1981.
    : : [/blue]
    : :
    : Wow! I wish i went that far back, the 'ol '360 (which i never even heard of - punch card??) must have been a joy. I am using a fairly modern computer (1.6GHz) to write this message, but i love to program assembler on my relativly ancient i486 SX 33Mhz running DOS6.2. I recently switched to the Pass32 assembler from a86, for it's many great features. What are you using to program now? Do you still tinker with Assembly?
    :
    :
    [blue]Of course, I am!
    ASM will never die! (or maybe I had too much coffee and not thinking clearly?!.. )

    BTW, right now I am working on a very exciting project - IDE for Win32 Assembly code. Full of nice features: (OOP, resource editor, auto-complete, even library of ready to use classes...)[/blue]
  • : [b][red]This message was edited by Wannabean333 at 2004-1-27 16:9:48[/red][/b][hr]
    : I'm 15 and I've been programming on and off for 2 years now. I started with basic c++ (no pointers) and ive been doing pretty well. I don't know very much but I'm satisfied with my progress. I'm just wondering how much experience everyone that uses this site has and how old you all are. I also would like to know how people here got started programming. I'm just curious.
    :
    : "It's only worth what someone will pay for it."
    : -Wannabean333 (*********)
    :
    :
    :

    I'm 31 and I started out programming on the Atari 400/800 in BASIC at age 9. From there I moved on to the Commodore 64 BASIC and tinkered around with it for awhile. After that, I kind of got side tracked and put programming on the back burner, but when I resumed later I started learning C. Presently, I am learning 80x86 Assembly and PIC Micro programming. I just wish I would of learned the assembly 1st since it would of made a drastic difference on the previous languages. It's really not that difficult, really! :-D

  • [purple]
    I am 25 (as of January) and I've always been interested in programming although I haven't learned or done that much. I started coding BASIC on the Commodore 16 which was cool at the time. I had an Amiga and I did a bit of GFA Basic. Now I have a Windows / Linux based PC and I started to learn C++ last year on and off and now I am learning C from Sams 'Teach Yourself C In 21 Days'.

    So quite a bit of experience but not much knowledge. I have been programming since I was a bout 7 or 8.

    I would like to programme for a living but without any collage / university qualifications I don't have much chance.

    :)
    [/purple]
  • : [purple]
    : I am 25 (as of January) and I've always been interested in programming although I haven't learned or done that much. I started coding BASIC on the Commodore 16 which was cool at the time. I had an Amiga and I did a bit of GFA Basic. Now I have a Windows / Linux based PC and I started to learn C++ last year on and off and now I am learning C from Sams 'Teach Yourself C In 21 Days'.
    :
    : So quite a bit of experience but not much knowledge. I have been programming since I was a bout 7 or 8.
    :
    : I would like to programme for a living but without any collage / university qualifications I don't have much chance.
    :
    : :)
    : [/purple]
    :

    Then you ought to get yourself into college and get a CS degtree =) Your only 25, and theres always financial aid around to help you pay for it if your poor like most college students...

    Me, I'm 29 and got started programming when I was about 7-8 on the commodore 64 in BASIC. Wrote a few cool games based on those simple c64 sprites, and later took a break for a while as teenage interests changed from programming to ... I have now been in college for around 5 yrs working on my CS degree, have lots of C, C++, and Java experience, little Perl, and html.



  • ::[red]Me, I'm 29 and got started programming when I was about 7-8 on the commodore 64 in BASIC.[/red]

    [green]Ahh the good ole days huhh? :-) I miss my little Commodore 64 puter! :-( Amiga was even better though. True Color, 16bit sound right out of[/green] [b]BOX[/b][green],and really no need for hardware upgrades! :-D[/green]
  • I'll be 40 in a month. I started programming in 1980 (high school CP/M BASIC), did a stint in the Army, then got into electronics - playing with Atari 400/800/ST's and PC's along the way. Night classe for BSCS, then working various coding tasks since 95 (C, Java, SQL, HP VEE), mostly in integration and test related stuff.

    I found it was good to have some electronics background - made all the stuff about registers and busses and memory architecture clearer when doing the actual work. Also made it easier to work with other hardware areas (communications, data capture & stimulus, test equipment) - and its fun to see actual hardware respond to your code:-).
  • : [purple]
    : I am 25 (as of January) and I've always been interested in programming although I haven't learned or done that much. I started coding BASIC on the Commodore 16 which was cool at the time. I had an Amiga and I did a bit of GFA Basic. Now I have a Windows / Linux based PC and I started to learn C++ last year on and off and now I am learning C from Sams 'Teach Yourself C In 21 Days'.
    :
    : So quite a bit of experience but not much knowledge. I have been programming since I was a bout 7 or 8.
    :
    : I would like to programme for a living but without any collage / university qualifications I don't have much chance.
    :
    : :)
    : [/purple]
    :
    I started learning C with the same book! (it came free with Borland C++ Builder) - but i must say it's not a very good one. I have looked at many others and TYC in 21Hours skips a lot of important stuff in condensing the material - there are way better books at the library.

    I also had an Amiga and messed around with Assembler (DevPac4) but never really got anywhere with it. Now I also have a Windows/Linux PC and am learning assembler and C (with much greater success)

    I also want to program for a living, but school is not financialy possible for me so i am teaching myself while keeping my job as an electronics technition. I disagree about not having a chance without formal training. My plan is to show employers a portfolio of what i have done and can do, and i think that would be worth a lot more than a piece of paper from a university or whatever.

    At the end of the day, what's most important to a company if you can do the job or not, and teaching yourself takes a lot more hard work and discipline - especialy while working another job. Don't give up!


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