broken forward link

Hi y'all

My win98 machine rebooted in a lightning strike. The .wpd file I was working with was truncated to about 2 meg from around 12. Scandisk reports that it is linking to an invalid address (corrupted forward link?). Where can I find a tool to help me find the next sector of this file and patch the link to it? I have not used the machine since the lightning so all the file should still be out there. I have a backup but it is a day old already!!

Any help greatly appreciated...

Best regards

Chris Needs

PS I can use debug to patch the address of the next sector into the current one, I just can't remember how the linkages work in Win98. Also, I suspect that Win98 debug (DOS 8.0?) does not show sector information anymore. Is this true?

Chris

Comments

  • Hi Chris!

    Take a look at "Easy Recovery" at either ontrack.com or McAffee.com

    They both have a demo program that you can download, and one of these two has a version that will let you recover two or three files. If I remember correcly, the Ontrack version won't actually recover anyhting, just tell you what it "would" recover if you choose to buy it. I believe that the McAfee version lets you recover a few files.

    If that file is the only one you want, then this should do. You will need to install a second hard drive, or have another formatted and accessible partition available on your current drive, becuase Easy Recovery does not fix the drive, but extracts the damaged file from the drive.

    Good Luck!

    Melissa

  • Hi Melissa

    Thank you for your post.

    I downloaded 37 odd meg from Mcafee called McafeeUtilities. This seemed to be where "Easy recovery" pointed me to. I installed what I thought I needed on a Win 95 machine on my LAN but the utility would not see any mapped drives. I don't want to install it on the problem machine in case the orphaned sectors are somehow back in the free sector list.

    A friend of mine is putting me in touch with a disk forensic guru so I will hopefully have some answers tomorrow.

    I am amazed that so few people know about this stuff. In my previous lives with IBM hardware and the Pick OS we used to be able to modify any bit anywhere. Are the machines really taking over? Or is it just Billy and his goats? Soon we'll be asking him for permission to go to the bathroom.

    All the best and thank you again...

    Chris



    : Hi Chris!
    :
    : Take a look at "Easy Recovery" at either ontrack.com or McAffee.com
    :
    : They both have a demo program that you can download, and one of these two has a version that will let you recover two or three files. If I remember correcly, the Ontrack version won't actually recover anyhting, just tell you what it "would" recover if you choose to buy it. I believe that the McAfee version lets you recover a few files.
    :
    : If that file is the only one you want, then this should do. You will need to install a second hard drive, or have another formatted and accessible partition available on your current drive, becuase Easy Recovery does not fix the drive, but extracts the damaged file from the drive.
    :
    : Good Luck!
    :
    : Melissa
    :
    :

  • Hi Chris:

    : Thank you for your post.


    :)


    : I downloaded 37 odd meg from Mcafee called McafeeUtilities. This seemed to be where "Easy recovery" pointed me to.

    Not what I had in mind. There's a separate utility calld "EasyRecovery". I think McAffee wants to sell you a "subscription" instead of the software. Take a look here:
    http://www.ontrack.com/easyrecovery/

    I'm sure that there was a free version that would at least copy a couple of files, if I could only remember where...


    :I installed what I thought I needed on a Win 95 machine on my LAN but the utility would not see any mapped drives. I don't want to install it on the problem machine in case the orphaned sectors are somehow back in the free sector list.

    Do you mean you were trying to map the defective drive to a another computer? These utilities use low-level code to access the drive, so I wouldn't try to do it that way.

    I usually pull the bad drive out of the computer, and install it into another working computer that has the recovery software installed. Then recover from the bad drive to the good drive.

    : A friend of mine is putting me in touch with a disk forensic guru so I will hopefully have some answers tomorrow.

    Good luck!


    : I am amazed that so few people know about this stuff. In my previous lives with IBM hardware and the Pick OS we used to be able to modify any bit anywhere.

    Well, I know how to do it! You still can modify any bit on the drive. There are disk edit utilities that enable you to do so. It's just that it gets more complicated with all the variations on OS versions. FAT, FAT32, NTFS, HPFS, etc., etc. It can be done, but it's tricky the first time. The people that do this often don't have much trouble.

    :Are the machines really taking over? Or is it just Billy and his goats? Soon we'll be asking him for permission to go to the bathroom.

    Well, there will always be people who expect to do everything the "easy" way, present company excepted! I spent the last two days recovering a server that crashed. Only thing lost was the time. Things still need to be done the "hard" way. Then again, my recovery was better than everybody having to re-type ten years' worth of info...

    : All the best and thank you again...
    :

    Well, good luck to you. I hope you get your file. My pleasure to help, though it doesn't seem I've helped you yet...


  • Hi

    I found a GREAT disk editing tool, WinHex from www.winhex.com

    I am not able to reconstruct the disk, the clusters don't seem to line up in any logical fashion that I can see. Don't want to waste any more time.

    But I found my data in two clusters. I inserted another drive in the machine and copied the data out of WinHex's dump into a temp file on the (new) d: drive.

    I'll tell Scandisk to truncate the original file (bye bye) and then I'll reconstruct it by inserting the graphics at the relevant points.

    I used Wordpad to make the document originally and it (quite intelligently, I thought) put markers in where I had linked in graphical images. What I don't understand is that a 10K (linked) graphic image swells the Word file by upto a meg? I know that today's programmers are not concerned about resources anymore (cheap and plentiful, aren't they?) but this is a ridiculous, sorry, outrageous waste of space. Any comments?

    Thank you for all the help and advice.

    Chris

    PS Hope your server's still OK.

    C

    : Hi Chris:
    :
    : : Thank you for your post.
    :
    :
    : :)
    :
    :
    : : I downloaded 37 odd meg from Mcafee called McafeeUtilities. This seemed to be where "Easy recovery" pointed me to.
    :
    : Not what I had in mind. There's a separate utility calld "EasyRecovery". I think McAffee wants to sell you a "subscription" instead of the software. Take a look here:
    : http://www.ontrack.com/easyrecovery/
    :
    : I'm sure that there was a free version that would at least copy a couple of files, if I could only remember where...
    :
    :
    : :I installed what I thought I needed on a Win 95 machine on my LAN but the utility would not see any mapped drives. I don't want to install it on the problem machine in case the orphaned sectors are somehow back in the free sector list.
    :
    : Do you mean you were trying to map the defective drive to a another computer? These utilities use low-level code to access the drive, so I wouldn't try to do it that way.
    :
    : I usually pull the bad drive out of the computer, and install it into another working computer that has the recovery software installed. Then recover from the bad drive to the good drive.
    :
    : : A friend of mine is putting me in touch with a disk forensic guru so I will hopefully have some answers tomorrow.
    :
    : Good luck!
    :
    :
    : : I am amazed that so few people know about this stuff. In my previous lives with IBM hardware and the Pick OS we used to be able to modify any bit anywhere.
    :
    : Well, I know how to do it! You still can modify any bit on the drive. There are disk edit utilities that enable you to do so. It's just that it gets more complicated with all the variations on OS versions. FAT, FAT32, NTFS, HPFS, etc., etc. It can be done, but it's tricky the first time. The people that do this often don't have much trouble.
    :
    : :Are the machines really taking over? Or is it just Billy and his goats? Soon we'll be asking him for permission to go to the bathroom.
    :
    : Well, there will always be people who expect to do everything the "easy" way, present company excepted! I spent the last two days recovering a server that crashed. Only thing lost was the time. Things still need to be done the "hard" way. Then again, my recovery was better than everybody having to re-type ten years' worth of info...
    :
    : : All the best and thank you again...
    : :
    :
    : Well, good luck to you. I hope you get your file. My pleasure to help, though it doesn't seem I've helped you yet...
    :
    :
    :

  • Hi Chris
    :
    : I found a GREAT disk editing tool, WinHex from www.winhex.com
    :

    Yes, WinHex is a good tool.

    : I am not able to reconstruct the disk, the clusters don't seem to line up in any logical fashion that I can see.

    In order to follow the clusters of a file, you need to start with the pointers in the directory entry for that file. The follow the trail of clusters in the FAT (if you're using FAT of course). That's the somewhat tricky part, if you've never done it.

    : But I found my data in two clusters. I inserted another drive in the machine and copied the data out of WinHex's dump into a temp file on the (new) d: drive.
    :

    Excellent! It sounds like you lucked out. The problem is usually that there is so much space on the drive, that it's hard to find your file by looking at each cluster. But if the file is a text file and you know some of the text in the file, as it sounds like you do, then it's a bit easier.

    : I'll tell Scandisk to truncate the original file (bye bye) and then I'll reconstruct it by inserting the graphics at the relevant points.
    :

    Sounds like the plan!


    : I used Wordpad to make the document originally and it (quite intelligently, I thought) put markers in where I had linked in graphical images. What I don't understand is that a 10K (linked) graphic image swells the Word file by upto a meg? I know that today's programmers are not concerned about resources anymore (cheap and plentiful, aren't they?) but this is a ridiculous, sorry, outrageous waste of space. Any comments?
    :

    Of course it's ridiculous. But a hard drive is like a closet - the more space you have, the more junk you put into it. In the days of 30K floppies and 5MB hard drives, we didn't do such things. Then again, we couldn't do graphics like today...


    : Thank you for all the help and advice.
    :
    You're welcome!

    : PS Hope your server's still OK.
    :
    It is now. I showed it who's boss!

    Melissa

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